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Matt Young's blog

3 ways to tell if your cat has fleas

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Cat overgrooming

Cats are great groomers and clean freaks. Their tongues are really rough specifically so they groom themselves with it. Because they are so good at grooming you won't often see a lot of fleas on them. There are a few things though that can give it away.

1. Look under their chin. 

You'll often see live fleas here or flea dirt. It's the one place on their body that they can't reach to groom with their tongue or their paws. The fleas will often hide out here so lift up that chin and part the hair

Is your garden poisonous?

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A brunsfelsia shrub

Last week I had a dog called Josie come in because she was tremoring all over and appeared very agitated and distressed. She was very close to seizuring now but had been fine earlier in the evening.

I gave her some medication to make her vomit and along with some bits of plastic bag (she had also got into a nappy earlier in the day, so yes he was a garbage guts) there was some small pieces of plant material and very small seeds.

1 Great Reason to Desex your Female Dog: Preventing Pyometron

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surgical field during pyometra surgery

Meet prescilla. She's normally an active little old dog and because there was no chance of her getting pregnant her owner had decided not to desex her.  Prescilla came in to see me a few weeks ago because she had gone off her food and was very quiet and lethargic and her belly was getting big.  She had been on heat a couple of months ago and there was no way she could have been pregnant. 

Prescilla the dog in a cage

How often should I apply Frontline to stop ticks?

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Ixodes Tick

Frontline is effective for reducing the chance of your pet getting tick paralysis. No product is 100% effective for ticks though so make sure you still check your pet daily for deadly paralysis ticks. 

Frontline needs to be applied more frequently for tick prevention than is does for treating fleas. It is really important that you apply it as directed. 

Dogs

Use Frontline Plus and apply it every 2 weeks for Ixodes ticks (the paralysis tick). Make sure you use the size appropriate for your dog.

Dental X-rays- what's the point?

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Dental X-ray

Dental X-rays can save your pet from ongoing painful conditions or save them having painful procedures that are unnecessary. 

A case that proves the point

The X-ray you see above is from a cat that we did a dental on a couple of weeks ago. Just from an examination under anaesthetic I knew that most of the teeth would need to come out. You might think if you're taking the teeth out anyway what's the point in x-raying them?

xrays allow us to visualise the roots of the teeth, see where they are, and in some cases if they still exist. 

Socialisation of puppies, what's the point?

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ryan cuddling a fluffy puppy

What is socialisation?

Socialisation in puppies is when the puppy learns to get along with other pups, people and other species of animal which they are likely to come in contact with later in life.

They don't neccessarily need to be best friends with these animals. A socialised pup might learn how to avoid getting scratched by a cat by leaving it alone and giving it space for example. 

This video is the ultimate in socialisation between 2 different species:

Putting the guts back in- inguinal hernia repair.

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Daisy posing for a photo

Daisy came to visit me last month because she had became extremely unwell overnight. She had been vomiting alot and was in pain and reluctant to move around. When I examined her she was extremely dehydrated and she was very painful in her belly. In her groin we found a large swelling that was painful to touch. I did an ultrasound on it and found that it contained gas. 

Based on these findings she was diagnosed with a strangulated inguinal hernia. 

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