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Matt Young's blog

Is my dog at risk of getting canine cough?

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Sick dog with a cough

People often believe that their dog is not at risk from getting canine cough because their dog "never leaves the yard". The opposite is actually true. The vast majority of dogs I see with canine cough are in this exact situation ie. they have little to no contact with other dogs.

What is canine cough?

Canine cough is an infectious disease of dogs which is also known as kennel cough, or infectious tracheobronchitis. We no longer call it kennel cough because dogs don't need direct contact with other dogs to get it.

You don't need to see fleas to have a flea problem

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Dog with flea allergy dermatitis

Why is my dog scratching? I've already treated it for fleas so it can't be fleas that are causing it.

This is a question I get all the time. Flea control is always important especially if you have an itchy dog but just because there are not alot of fleas present doesn't mean that fleas are not the underlying cause of your dog's itch.

Is chocolate your poison of choice? Don't make it your pet's!

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No chocolate for dogs

Easter is that time of year when there is alot of chocolate around. While chocolate is yummy and has alot of positives there are 2 things that are bad about chocolate:

  1. It makes you fat
  2. It is poisonous to dogs and cats

I can't do anything about the first problem for you but I can help you with the second issue. 

How does chocolate poison dogs and cats?

Chocolate contains theobromine which acts as a nervous system stimulant in dogs and cats. Whether or not they are affected depends on:

4 Simple Steps to Make it Easier to Bring Your Cat to the Vets

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cranky cat in a travel cage

Choose a cage that is enclosed & can be pulled apart

Cats find a trip in the car terrifying. When cats are scared they try and hide. Hiding reduces their anxiety levels, if they can’t hide their anxiety levels increase more and more with time. By the time they arrive at our end they are ready to explode and some are just impossible to deal with.

A good cage is completely enclosed so the cat can feel like it’s hiding away.

Dogs shouldn't skip

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Claire in a cage, looking sad

Patella (knee cap) dislocation

Claire came to us a couple of weeks ago because she was skipping on one of her back legs. She would be running along and hold one back leg up in the air and skip along with the other. This is a common problem in small breed dogs and is caused by a luxating patella or dislocating kneecap.

The Perils of Poisoning Rodents

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Maja & Lily feeling sick and sorry for themselves

Oh no! Lily and Maja just chewed a box of rat bait!

Lilly and Maja came in earlier this week as they were found in the yard eating a packet of rat bait. When we suspect a dog may have eaten rat bait if it's within 1 hour of potentially ingesting it we give medications to induce vomiting to empty their stomachs.  This removes as much of the poison as possible to limit the amount that is taken into their circulation. Fortunately the poison contains a dye so it usually quite obvious when they have ingested the bait by looking at the vomit:

Dog wets bed

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Lilly the dachsund that had blader stones with her owner.

Leaking urine (urinary incontinence)

Leaking urine while asleep (urinary incontinence) is a very common problem in dogs and there can be a number of causes. Lilly came to use last November because she was having this issue. We did some investigation, fixed her issue and solved the problem, but we also solved another problem as well.

Crusty Rabbit Ears

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Rabbit with crusty ears

Rabbits tend to be very quiet creatures. They don’t complain unless they are in extreme pain. Just because they don’t say anything though doesn’t mean that all is OK with them. Their quiet nature also means that they don’t necessarily show obvious signs of pain or discomfort even when it is definitely present.

Take Thumper, for example. He came in because his owner had noticed lumps coming out of his ears. There were a heap of crusts that seemed to be growing out of the ear. These crusts were quite dry and firm but crumbled on the end:

The good, the bad and the ugly of dog brushes

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Jack the dog enjoying having a brush with a slicker brush

Regular brushing is a great thing to do for your dog:

  • It keeps your dogs coat healthy and knot free
  • It’s a fantastic way to feel all around to check for ticks and to see fleas
  • It encourages healthy skin.

Choosing the right brush though can be very difficult and confusing. There are a large range of brushes and combs available in all sorts of styles. Dog's coats also come in a large range of thicknesses, lengths and hair types.

A dog social with coffee

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puppy on lead

Join us this Saturday the 11th January 2014 at 4pm for a walk out to Kanahooka point and back. 

This is purely a social outing and anyone is welcome to attend. Feel free to bring a friend!! 

Don't worry if you don't have a dog. You are still welcome to join us, I have plenty of dogs so you can always borrow one ;-)

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